Federal lawsuit claims cops shot teen in the back twice, removed bullets by hand – bodycam says otherwise

HAYWARD, CA- A federal lawsuit that was recently filed is alleging that after Hayward police officers shot a 17-year-old in the back, they removed the bullets by hand before the paramedics arrived.

According to reports, the lawsuit also claims that the officers wrongfully shot the teenage boy. The lawsuit states that the teenager fell asleep in his cousin’s car near the scene of looting in the midst of Black Lives Matter protests in the city.

Authorities said that officers were dispatched to a CVS pharmacy in the area of the looting. The teenagers lawyer, Adante Pointer, claims that his client had been with his cousin in the car, but that he was alone when he woke up.

Pointer alleged that the 17-year-old was confused and scared when he woke up, so he attempted to drive away. The lawsuit claims that Hayward police officers then shot the teen as he happened to be driving by them.

After the officer-involved shooting, Hayward Police Officer Samuel Tomlinson said that he believed he was going to be hit by the teenager driving the car, so he opened fire. The other officer, Officer Stephen Akacsos, also fired his duty weapon. He believed that his partner had “either been shot or struck by the vehicle.”

The 17-year-old quickly crashed the car after the shooting and fled on foot. He attempted to hide in the bushes, but he was found by the police and arrested on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon on a police officer. According to Pointer:

“The officers took the bullets out and hauled him off toe Juvenile Hall. It’s completely inappropriate and fortunately it didn’t cause more severe damage to him.”

He added:

“It’s barbaric, the way in which they tried to minimize the harm they caused this young man.”

Pointer’s chain of events outline in the federal lawsuit are vastly different from the account the Hayward Police Department (HPD) released shortly after the officer-involved shooting. The department also released body cam footage from the incident. 

Hayward Police Chief Toney Chaplin described the entire incident as “chaotic” and said that the body cam footage did not capture much of what happened. He said that his officers were dealing with a “night of significant looting” on June 1st, which followed a “day of peaceful demonstrations.”

According to the chief, officers responded to the CVS after receiving a 911 call that people were looting the store and that possible gunshots were heard in the area. As police tried to take two men in a parked car into custody, multiple other cars began fleeing the area “at a hight rate of speed.”

Chaplin said that one of those cars “made a U-turn and drove directly at one of our officers standing outside of his patrol car.” That officer believed that he was going to be “intentionally hit or killed” by the driver, so he discharged his duty weapon to “stop the threat.”

The chief added that the driver veered off and sped past him just as the second officer, believing his partner had been shot or hit by the car, fired his duty weapon at the individual driving the car. Chief Chaplin said:

“The driver sustained what was described as a grazing wound by medical staff.”

The Alameda County District Attorney’s Office has already dismissed the charge of deadly assault on a police office against the 17-year-old.  The teenagers mother, Jael Barnes said in a statement:

“I feel like all they saw was a black face and just believed he did a crime. Not only does he now have these physical wounds, he has these mental wounds as well, which will never go away.”

On Christmas Eve, Pointer posted a photo of the teen’s alleged gunshot sounds on Twitter. 

He wrote in another post:

“The cops did this to a kid when the eyes of the world were looking! Imagine what happens when NO ONE is looking!”

The HPD Internal Affairs Unit and Criminal Investigations Bureau will determine whether or not the officers acted in accordance with department policy during the incident. 

Do you want to join our private family of first responders and supporters?  Get unprecedented access to some of the most powerful stories that the media refuses to show you.  Proceeds get reinvested into having active, retired and wounded officers, their families and supporters tell more of these stories.  Click to check it out.

LET Unity

Grand jury indicts San Francisco police officer for a shooting a suspect who bashed him over the head with a glass bottle

December 8th, 2020

SAN FRANCISCO, CA- A grand jury has indicted a San Francisco police officer in connection with the shooting of 25-year-old Jamaica Hampton after he repeatedly bashed the officer over the head with a glass vodka bottle back in December 2019.

The San Francisco Examiner reported that on Friday, December 4th, a grand jury determined that there is probable cause to believe that Officer Christopher Flores committed a crime in connection with the December 17, 2019 shooting that took place in the Mission District.

Reportedly, Officer Flores was one of two San Francisco police officers who discharged their service weapons during the incident. Hampton, who attacked the officer with the glass bottle, was hit in the leg with a bullet. His leg was later amputated.

According to body-worn camera footage of the incident, Hampton was rising to his knees after being shot by Officer Sterling Hayes, when Officer Flores, advanced toward Hampton and fired a single shot.

District Attorney Chesa Boudin, who is the son of two cop-killers, the grand jury also indicted Hampton on unspecified charges on Friday, December 4th. Boudin said:

“As soon as the defendants are served with the warrants, we will be able to share with the public the scheduled arraignment date, the bail amount set by the court, and the specific charges that the grand jury chose to indict on.”

Reportedly, Boudin did not request pretrial detention for Officer Flores or Hampton. Instead, he encouraged them both to “voluntarily surrender.” However, the court has set bail at a higher amount, which means Officer Flores and Hampton could spend some time in County Jail unless they can afford to bail out.

Nicole Pifari, an attorney for Officer Flores, said that both officers fired their service weapons at Hampton to defend themselves from death or serious bodily injury during a “brutal, unprovoked, and incredibly violent attack.” She said in a statement:

“We look forward to learning how the district attorney plans to prove what injury, if any, the single round fired by Officer Flores caused Mr. Hampton.”

San Francisco Police Officers Association (POA) President Tony Montoya defended Officer Flores after the news of the indictment broke. He said:

“Former Public Defender Ches Boudin’s decision is absolutely appalling. Unprovoked, Jamaica Hampton brutally attacked Officer Christopher Flores, bludgeoning him repeatedly over the head with a Vodka bottle causing severe injuries to Officer Flores’ head.”

He added:

“Mr. Hampton was the aggressor and Officer Flores acted to protect his own life and to protect the public. Boudin’s failure to personally file charges against Mr. Hampton for his vicious attacks on our officers sends a clear message that Boudin has no intention of protecting officers who are victims of violence.”

He said:

“Mr. Boudin is communicating to law enforcement officers today that they must choose between protecting their lives or protecting their freedom, but they cannot do both.”

According to reports, Hampton had previously been charged with two counts of assault with a deadly weapon and vandalism in connection with the attack, but Boudin dropped those charges in January just after he took office.

Danielle Harris, a public defender representing Hampton, said she was “saddened” but not surprised to learn of the indictment against her client. She said in a statement:

“Jamaica has been punished far more than the law would ever allow. I don’t believe that our legal system or community have anything to gain from prosecuting Jamaica Hampton given the swift and severe street justice that was dealt to him by police.”

Office Flores is the second San Francisco Police Department officer to be charged in connection with a police shooting in just a matter of weeks after years without any officers facing charges in shooting cases.

On November 23rd, Boudin announced his decision to charge another officer, Christopher Samayoa, with manslaughter for fatally shooting 42-year-old Keita O’Neil through the windshield of a moving police vehicle during a December 2017 pursuit in the Bayview. 

Do you want to join our private family of first responders and supporters?  Get unprecedented access to some of the most powerful stories that the media refuses to show you.  Proceeds get reinvested into having active, retired and wounded officers, their families and supporters tell more of these stories.  Click to check it out.

LET Unity

DA Boudin announces historic charges against former San Francisco officer fatal shooting from years ago

December 5th, 2020

SAN FRANCISCO, CA- On November 23, 2020, District Attorney Boudin announced that the District Attorney’s Office has filed homicide charges against former San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) officer Chris Samayoa, who fatally shot Keita O’Neil back in December 2017.

According to reports, the homicide occurred before Boudin’s election and remained under investigation when Boudin took office. Then, following a careful review of the case, the District Attorney’s Office filed a warrant for Chris Samayoa’s arrest, which a judge signed on November 21, 2020.

The news release said that the District Attorney’s Office formally filed charges of voluntary manslaughter, involuntary manslaughter, assault with a semiautomatic firearm, assault by a police officer, and discharge of a firearm with gross negligence.

It has been reported that this case is believed to be the first homicide prosecution against a law enforcement officer in San Francisco history. At a news conference, Boudin said:

“As far as we are aware, this is the first ever time that the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office has filed charges against a law enforcement officer for a homicide while on duty.”

Boudin added:

“For too long, we have seen the failures of our legal system to hold police accountable for the violence committed against the members of the public they are entrusted to keep safe. In my administration, police officers are not above the law.”

Boudin said:

“Police officers are obligated to follow the law when using force, even when responding to serious crimes. As District Attorney, I will continue to hold accountable officers who inflict unlawful violence and breach the trust the public places in them.”

Reportedly, back on December 1, 2017, SFPD officers Edric Talusan and Chris Samayoa followed a suspect that was thought to have carjacked a California State Lottery minivan. Officer Talusan, who was driving, and Officer Samayoa, who was in the passenger seat, observed and followed the van through the Bayview District.

After following the van for a few blocks, the van reached a dead-end-street and 42-year-old Keita O’Neil jumped out and began to run on foot. As other patrol cars closed in on him and blocked his path, O’Neil ran past the police car where Officer Samayoa was still sitting in the passenger seat.

Reportedly, Officer Samayoa pointed his service weapon at O’Neil and shot him through the passenger side window of the patrol car, killing O’Neil.  O’Neil was unarmed and his cause of death was determined a homicide.

Officer Samayoa failed to turn his body camera on until after the shooting, however, the body camera captured video of the shooting because body cameras automatically record the 30 seconds prior to their activation.

The footage shows Samayoa drawing his pistol while the cruiser was still moving. The video then shows him open the side door and fire a single shot through the window as O’Neil rushed by in the opposite direction. 

As a result of the incident, Officer Samayoa was terminated from his position as an officer with the SFPD. His termination came three months after the fatal shooting of O’Neil. Two weeks after the fatal shooting, O’Neil’s family filed a lawsuit against the SFPD.

O’Neils relatives were recently told about the decision to charge the officer and O’Neils aunt, April Green said:

“I am happy to hear this news and hoping it brings some justice to our family.”

Tony Montoya, president of the San Francisco Police Officers Association said that the organization will support Samayoa during the legal process. He said in a statement:

“We are committed to ensuring that Christopher and his family are supported during this difficult time and that he is accorded his due process rights and provided with a vigorous defense against these charges.”

Do you want to join our private family of first responders and supporters?  Get unprecedented access to some of the most powerful stories that the media refuses to show you.  Proceeds get reinvested into having active, retired and wounded officers, their families and supporters tell more of these stories.  Click to check it out.

LET Unity

Former San Francisco police officer just charged with manslaughter. It’s from a 2017 shooting.

November 29th, 2020

SAN FRANCISCO, CA– Since Black Lives Matter started demanding police officer’s heads on silver platters, leaders have vowed to prosecute past and present cases to appease them. 

Officials have now gone back three years to review a police involved shooting case from 2017, and have brought charges against the officer.

Former San Francisco police officer, Chris Samayoa is facing manslaughter and weapons charges for allegedly shooting and killing an unarmed man accused of carjacking a state-owned vehicle in the Bayview District in 2017.

On Monday afternoon, November 23rd, San Francisco District Attorney Chesa Boudin announced the charges, saying that this is the first prosecution case against a law enforcement officer in the city’s history. 

On Saturday, November 28th, a judge signed off on a warrant for Samayoa’s arrest.

ABC 7 reported that Samayoa has been charged with voluntary manslaughter, involuntary manslaughter assault with a semiautomatic firearm, assault by a police officer and discharge of a firearm with gross negligence.

In December 2017, police said Keita O’Neil carjacked a California State Lottery van and led officers on a pursuit through the Bayview and into a public housing area.

According to police, O’Neil then slowed the van down, jumped out of it, and ran toward the marked police car.

The District Attorney’s office said Samayoa shot O’Neil as he ran past the police car.

Boudin said in a statement:

“As other patrol cars closed in on him and blocked his path, Mr. O’Neil ran past the police car where Officer Samayoa was seated in the passenger seat. Officer Samayoa pointed his gun and shot Mr. O’Neil through the passenger side window of the patrol car, killing Mr. O’Neil,” 

The deadly shooting occurred just three days after officer Samayoa graduated from the police academy. 

Boudin said:

“Body camera footage shows not a single other officer pulled out their service weapon or pointed it at O’Neil,” 

The San Francisco Police Department fired officer Samayoa three months after the incident occurred. 

DA Boudin released a statement on Monday reiterating that police officers are not above the law, and they will be held accountable.

He said:

“For too long, we have seen the failures of our legal system to hold police accountable for the violence committed against the members of the public they are entrusted to keep safe,” 

He continued:

“In San Francisco, there has been long history of officer involved shootings leading to no accountability whatsoever, further cementing the idea that police are above the law. That stops today,” 

Boudin also said in the statement that O’Neil’s family had been told of the charges being brought against the former officer, to which O’Neil’s aunt, April Green, expressed her gratitude saying: 

“I am happy to hear this news, and hoping it brings some justice to our family,” 

Criminal defense attorney John Burris, who represented the O’Neil family, was also pleased with the charges, saying:

“I was quite pleased to see it,” 

He went on to say:

“I was a little surprised that it wasn’t murder, but I understand the DA thinks manslaughter is a charge that is easier to prove than murder.”

ABC7 reported that they reached out to Tony Montoya, the president of the San Francisco Police Officer’s Association.

Montoya released a statement, saying:

“The criminal justice system will allow for the facts surrounding this case to be disclosed. We are committed to ensuring that Christopher and his family are supported during this difficult time and that he is accorded his due process rights and provided with a vigorous defense against these charges,” 

Want to make sure you never miss a story from Law Enforcement Today?  With so much “stuff” happening in the world on social media, it’s easy for things to get lost.  

Facebook Follow First

Go to Source
Author: Jenna Curren

Author: admin

I'm awesome! What else would I say about myself.